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Cancer He Said by Jane Grealy

Cancer He Said

Jane Grealy

Sitter

Prof Andreas Obermair

Medium

Oil on linen

Dimensions

152 x 101 cm

Representation

May Space

Category

Sylvia Jones Prize for Women Artists

About the artwork and sitter

“Cancer” he said as he stood at the end of my bed. A few days later “We got it all”. This man and his team saved my life. What drives him to be constantly searching for a better outcome for women’s cancer? From where does his inspiration come to drive his research? When asked, he said that an idea could come when least expected, sparked by a comment from a patient or a visiting researcher, a question raised by a colleague, an insight given by his wife. – Jane Grealy

Grealy captures this moment in time as Andreas Obermair stands at the end of her hospital bed. Obermair is a gynaecological oncologist and Professor at UQ. A dedicated researcher, he is focussed on creating gentler, kinder treatments for cancer patients.

About the artist

Jane Grealy was a successful architectural illustrator before turning to fine arts. This training underpins her remarkable technical skills. Her works are finely drawn and composed, and convey compelling narratives. She says: “I find portraits the most challenging.” She has been a finalist in the Portia Geach Memorial Award, and a semi-finalist in the Doug Moran National Portrait Prize.

“When asked what was most important to him, he said that an idea could come when least expected, sparked by a comment from a patient or a visiting researcher, a question raised by a colleague, an insight given by his wife. So Andreas is a 'creative' too!”

Behind the scenes

The very first sketch is from when I was in hospital.

“Cancer” he said as he stood at the end of my bed. A few days later “We got it all”. This man and his team had saved my life. What drives him to be constantly searching for a better outcome for women’s cancer? From where does his inspiration come to drive his research? What makes him tick and how could I show it? Portraits are the hardest type of art to resolve. How much or how little do you or your subject want to convey? And what should that be?

When asked what was most important to him, he said that an idea could come when least expected, sparked by a comment from a patient or a visiting researcher, a question raised by a colleague, an insight given by his wife. So Andreas is a “creative” too!